The Liturgical Calendar

Last night at RCIA class we all received a copy of this beautiful Liturgical Calendar. The artist is Laura James, in “a vibrant style inspired by the art of ancient Christian Ethiopia” (quoting the text accompanying the calendar). The pictures are all of strong, faithful Biblical women. The one in the center is an illustration of the Visitation, and surrounding the calendar wheel are (clockwise from the lower left): Miriam dancing and praising God after the crossing of the Red Sea; Ruth gleaning in the barley field (with Naomi and Boaz in the background); Mary, Martha and Lazarus entertaining Jesus in Bethany (Mary anointing Jesus’ feet and Martha serving the guests); and in the lower right, Mary Magdalene telling the disciples of Jesus’ resurrection.

2015 Year of Grace

We discussed the seasons of the church year, going through each one, beginning with Advent, and mentioning the colors and activities associated with each season. Then we went through some general questions that people had.

Not exactly a thrilling evening, but they can’t all be, eh? 🙂

The RCIA questions were: What season are you drawn to and why? Was there anything discussed tonight that you would like to know more about?

I’m drawn to Lent, and always was as a child as well. Perhaps it’s due to the possibility of change and self-renewal that Lent offers. A challenge to improve oneself! I’ve always loved that. And that’s the same reason I’m going through all of this right now, learning about and converting to Catholicism. Hoping to keep on keeping on… 🙂

And when I was a child, I was drawn to Advent as well. It was such a mystical time to my childlike mind: winter nights, candles and incense and the dark church, and the Advent hymns (which are not the same as the Christmas hymns), many of them a cappella. So beautiful and mysterious to me as a child.

As for anything I would like to know more about, I still don’t have any pressing questions. I don’t know why. I guess because the church I was raised in (Anglican) was so similar to Catholicism, so there’s nothing very unfamiliar to me. Even one of the questions last night, about the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist was familiar, because I think our particular Anglican church, that I attended as a child, believed in that. I know it varies from one Anglican church to another, if it’s “high church” or “low church”, whether they believe in the Real Presence, but ours was fairly “high church” (which explains all the candles and incense and a cappella hymns!)

I’m definitely looking forward to next week’s RCIA class, which is to be about Sin, Salvation and Morality. Engaging topics!

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6 thoughts on “The Liturgical Calendar

  1. For me, it has taken a lifetime to learn the true beauty of the Catholic Faith…and there is so much more to learn. You will receive many truths and answers to questions you didn’t even think to ask:-)

    May God bless you in your journey!!!
    Bernadette

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I only just started reading The Feasts: How the Church Year Forms Us as Catholics, but so far I like it.

    Since being an adult, my heart doesn’t get into Lent. I do all the necessary things, but something is missing. Easter just doesn’t seem as glorious as it was when I was a kid. My family growing up gave up TV and did tons of things for Lent. Easter was slightly more glorious for me than Christmas. I think the Holy Spirit is telling me to look into fasting more deeply.

    So, as my pre-Lenten reading, I’ve got a book called The Spirituality of Fasting.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Liturgical Calendar is one of the many aspects of Catholicism that I love. It reminds me that the Gospel isn’t just a story we hear once and then move forward from, but that we relive over and over again. Like the Rosary, it draws my attention to particular aspects of Christ’s life, death and resurrection, and each year is an invitation to look at it and live it a little more closely than before, and perhaps in a new way.

    Anyway, thanks for sharing your experience, and many blessings to you!

    Liked by 1 person

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